Day Eighteen: February 26, on Black History Month

Day Eighteen: February 26, on Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, I am recommending the following five texts on Afro-Caribbean Philosophy

  1. “Black Skin, White Masks” by Frantz Fanon
  2. “On Being Human as Praxis” by Sylvia Wynter
  3. “Poetics of Relation” by Edouard Glissant
  4. “Caliban’s Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy” by Paget Henry
  5. “ Caliban’s Freedom: The Early Political Thought of C.L.R. James” by Anthony B. Bogues

***Bonus Texts: “Les Théoriciens au Pouvoir” by Demesvar Delorme; “The Equality of the Human Races” by Joseph Antenor Firmin; “The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey or Africa for the Africans Volumes I and II” by Amy Jacques Garvey; “Discourse on Colonialism,” and “Return to My Native Land” by Aimé Césaire; “Negritude Women” by T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting; “Caribbean Discourse” by Edouard Glissant; “Thinking in Public: Faith, Development, and Secularism in Jacques Roumain” by Celucien L. Joseph; “Que signiphie philosopher en Haiti? Un autre Concept du Vodou” by Glodel Mezilas; “L’ere du metissage. Variations sur la Creolisation, Politique, ethique et philosophie de la diversalite” by Edelyn Dorismond; “Main Currents in Caribbean Thought” by Gordon Lewis; “An Introduction to Africana Philosophy” by Lewis Gordon; “Black Heretics, Black Prophets: Radical Political Intellectuals” by Anthony B. Bogues; “C. L. R. James: His Intellectual Legacies” edited by Selwyn R. Cudjoe and William E. Cain; “Rastafari: Roots and Ideology” by Barry Chevannes; “C. L. R. James Rader” edited by Anna Grimshaw; “Hispanic/Latino Identity: A Philosophical Perspective” by Jorge Gracia; “Against War: Views from the Underside of Modernity” by Nelson Maldonado-Torres; “Haitian Epistemology” by Paul C. Mocombe (DrPaul Camy Mocombe)

*** Every day is Black History Month.

Every day we celebrate human beings created in the image of God.

Every day we celebrate the gift of life and the gift of black life because black people and all people MATTER to God.

#CelebratingBlackHistoryMonth

#CelebratingBlackHistoryDiasporically

#CelebratingBlackHistoryWithaPanAfricanistintent

10 thinkers that shaped me

10 thinkers that shaped me

  1. Jean Price-Mars
  2. Jacques Roumain
  3. Lépold Senghor
  4. James Cone
  5. John Piper
  6. W. E. B. Du Bois
  7. Langston Hughes
  8. Jean Bertrand Aristide
  9. Edwidge Danticat
  10. James Baldwin

*** Other writers include Cheikh-Anta Diop, Joseph Antenor Firmin, Frantz Fanon, Aimé Césaire, C. L. R. James, Bolasi E. Idowu,  Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe, John Mbiti, John Dewey, William James, Karl Marx, John Calvin, St Augustine, Emily Dickinson, Claude McKay, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, James Weldon Johnson, Jeanne “Jane” Nardal, Paulette Nardal, Anna Julia Haywood Cooper, Dwight N. Hopkins, Delores S. Williams, Gustavo Gutiérrez, Leonardo Boff, Juan Luis Segundo, Enrique Dussel.

***Who are the 10 thinkers that shaped you?

“The Theological Baldwin”

“The Theological Baldwin”

James Baldwin was the most theological of all American novelists. In his fiction, he masterfully brings in conversation theology and art, the sphere of the sacred and the sphere of the profane, God and his creation.

Baldwin could not keep God away from literature, and for him, African American literature presupposes a strong ethical system grounded on Baldwin’s thick theological worldview and cosmic humanist vision–whether he writes about America’s anti-black racism as its greatest theological heresy and America’s slavery as its apex of moral decadence, homosexual love and relations, Harlem’s prostitution and drugs culture, the problem of evil and black theodicy, the imperative of self sacrifice and collective commitment, and the need for Americans to create a new country based on the ethics of interdependence, love, and mutual reciprocity, etc.

“The most dangerous creation of any society is the man who has nothing to lose.”
–James Baldwin, “The Fire Next Time”

Day Seventeen: February 25, on Black History Month

Day Seventeen: February 25, on Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, I am recommending the following five texts on African Philosophy:

  1. “Consciencism” by Kwame Nkrumah
  2. “Negritude et Humanisme” by Leopold Sedar Senghor
  3. “Uhuru na Ujamaa: Freedom and Socialism” by Julius Nyerere
  4. “African Religions and Philosophy” by John Mbiti
  5. “The Invention of Africa: Gnosis, Philosophy, and the Order of Knowledge” by V. Y. Mudimbe

***Bonus texts: “On the Absence of Sensation in the Human Mind and its Presence in our Organic and Living Body,” and “Treatise on the Art of Philosophising Soberly and Accurately” by Anton Wilhelm Amo or Anthony William Amo
; “The Akan Conceptual Scheme: An Essay on Philosophical Thought” by Kwame Gyekye; Cultural Universals and Particulars: An African Perspective,” and “Philosophy and An African Culture” by Kwasi Wiredu; “African Philosophy in Search of Identity,” and Self and Community in a Changing World” By D. A. Masolo; “The Hermeneutics of African Philosophy: Horizon and Disclosure” by Tsenay Serequeberhan; “In My Father’s House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture” by Kwame Anthony Appiah; “Achieving our Humanity: The Idea of the Postracial Future” by Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze; “The Idea of Africa” by V. Y. Mudimbe; “Tradition and Modernity: Philosophical Reflections on the African Experience by Kwame Gyekye; “African Philosophy: Myth and Reality” by Paulin Hountondji; and “The Ink of the Scholars: Reflections on Philosophy in Africa,” “African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson and the Idea of Negritude,” and “Islam and Open Society Fidelity and Movement in the Philosophy of Muhammad Iqbal” by Souleymane Bachir Diagne

*** Every day is Black History Month.

Every day we celebrate human beings created in the image of God.

Every day we celebrate the gift of life and the gift of black life because black people and all people MATTER to God.

#CelebratingBlackHistoryMonth

#CelebratingBlackHistoryDiasporically

#CelebratingBlackHistoryWithaPanAfricani

Day Sixteen: February 24, on Black History Month

Day Sixteen: February 24, on Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, I am recommending the
following five texts on African American (Political & Cultural) Philosophy:

  1. “The Souls of Black Folk” by W.E. B. Du Bois
  2. “The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond” edited by Leonard Harris.
  3. “The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism” by Cornel West
  4. “Women, Race, & Class” by Angela Y. Davis
  5. “On Race and Philosophy” by Lucius T. Outlaw (Jr.)

***Bonus Texts: “Philosophy born of struggle: Anthology of Afro-American philosophy from 1917” edited by Leonard Harris; “Transcending the Talented Tenth: Black Leaders and American Intellectual” by Joy James; “The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity” by Tommie Shelby; “Lines of Descent: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Emergence of Identity” by Kwame Anthony Appiah; and “Bad Faith and Antiblack Racism” by Lewis R. Gordon

*** Every day is Black History Month.

Every day we celebrate human beings created in the image of God.

Every day we celebrate the gift of life and the gift of black life because black people and all people MATTER to God.

#CelebratingBlackHistoryMonth

#CelebratingBlackHistoryDiasporically

#CelebratingBlackHistoryWithaPanAfricanistintent

“The Paradox of Development and the NGO System in Haiti”

“The Paradox of Development and the NGO System in Haiti”

Religious organizations working in Haiti have contributed substantially to a backward economic and political structure and mess in Haiti. Yet they are the major relief programs in Haiti in alleviating pain and suffering, and in providing medical, educational, and food assistance to the Haitian poor and the orphans.

The Haitian government has no intervention programs to assist the Haitian poor, to rehabilitate street children and rèstavèk (domestic children workers) children in the country, and to educate the country’s enormous illiterate population. The Haitian government provides no uplift or welfare programs and temporary reliefs or aids to the unemployed, the retiree, the disabled, etc.

Yes, the Haitian government has preconditioned the creation of the “NGO nation,” heavily supported by selfish and charlatan foreign religious-political organizations in the country. Charity, grants, or foreign aids without an adequate economic structure and a sustainable development program at the national level is a waste of human resources.

Day Fifteen: February 21, on Black History Month

Day Fifteen: February 21, on Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, I am recommending the following five texts on Afro-Latin American Literature:

  1. “Man-Making Words: Selected Poems of Nicolas Guillen” by Nicolas Guillen
  2. “Juyungo” by Adalberto Ortiz
  3. “Changó, the Biggest Badasss” by Manuel Zapata Olivella
  4. “Drums under my skin” by Luz Argentina Chiriboga
  5. “Our Lady of the Night” by Mayra Santos Febres

*** Every day is Black History Month.

Every day we celebrate human beings created in the image of God.

Every day we celebrate the gift of life and the gift of black life because black people and all people MATTER to God.

#CelebratingBlackHistoryMonth

#CelebratingBlackHistoryDiasporically

#CelebratingBlackHistoryWithaPanAfricanistIntent