“Your Body”: A Poem of Masculine Gaze

“Your Body”

Put on a display
to be watched, an image of his pleasure
abused and traumatized, a victim of his presence
one-night stand on steam
condemned and humiliated,
an act of violence.

Wanted for pleasure
for his passion, take-away
to his satisfaction, patriarchal muse in motion
boosting his ego,
ensuring his masculine power,
redeeming his insecurity,
his gaze shifted away from you.

Desired to bear his children
not a son to behold, but a song of his fantasy
not a daughter of charm, but a poem of his demise
a citizen in style, NO!
a leader of tomorrow, Not a all!
but a man of his kind.

“Nested Ring of Splendor”: A Poem for and in memory of Hélène Joseph

“Nested Ring of Splendor”
for and in memory of Hélène Joseph

We remember the day when God spat in the wind to create you.
It was before the day of rest, the Sabbath of peace.
The Divine graced the world with your presence, the first woman, the mother of life.
On January 3, 1947, “The Day of Venus,” you became the daughter of Saturn,
the crown Jewel of our life system.
Candle in the dark, your light shines many paths,
when we venture in the valley of obscurity, you enhance visibility.
when we travel in the mountain of ignorance, you give understanding.
You are like the sea-goat in two harmonious forms,
merging drylands and the seas,
linking the children of the sea
and the children of the earth…
as one big family.
You clothe them with wisdom, creativity, and identity.

Mother of 7 beautiful rings, orbiting our Saturn of life,
you put a rainbow in your daughters’ hands,
to display the optical illusion of life,
each one nesting in the sanctuary of your splendor…
in search of the rainbow of life…
You sealed your sons’ future with the rarest pearl in the world.
With your rainbow rings, you filled in the gaps in their life,
unifying them as one.
In your womb, you nurtured life,
From your breath, you gave birth to life
Under your teaching, they grew, evolved, and became wise.
You fed them, sustained them with language,
words that have no end…
sentences with no stops…
You assured their reproduction through the next generation…
You kept them safe, taught them to crawl…
Under your shelter, they found a home,
both loving and good,
beautiful and sweet.

Clothing them with the majesty of motherhood,
with love and peaceful beauty, you bind them all together
in perfect harmony and correlation.
Mother of seven gateways and thresholds,
you protect our throne rooms,
and guard the entryways of the temple of our hearts.
Your limitless resilience, oh the Goddess of every Capricorn,
pushes us forward to prevail over life adversity and painful memory.
Through your daring ambition, we are made strong;
When we are afraid, we remember your courage.
When we lose hope, your spirit inspires faith and trust.
You fill our hearts with joy and laughter.
You will always be the glorious Moon of our galaxy.

Oh, Mother of 75 years today,
Your days were shortened to only 72 innocent years,
but your strength endures…
your humility is transmissible…
you hold perpetual kindness in your healing wings…
You adorn nature with fresh carnations,
a symbolic gift of friendship and trust to humanity.
Yet you will live in us for 72 thousand years in future bliss,
You, our “Nested Ring of Splendor.”

On your birthday,
we will offer you pearls made of raindrops,
coming from faraway lands,
where it does not rain,
a place where roses bloom in spring,
a place where the sun always shines bright,
a place where we can kiss the moon dream at dawn.
We will reactivate your memories,
stored in scattered phases of life.
We will dig the earth to wrap your body,
made of gold and light.
We will dance in the dark with you between our arms,
we will smile at your simple acts of love…
we will sing your name in places,
where life never ends
where you will be Queen,
where your love, the ruling King.
where your virtues, the guiding principles of life.
We will tell your story, the story of the Queen who never dies.

The Last Love Poem!

The Last Love Poem!

I will not write you another love poem,
poems made of love inks do not tattoo your heart.
I will not send you another love letter,
with the same magical love languages.
You said “You are not my muse.”
I wrote you love songs with the pencil of God,
to keep you in my destiny,
for our love to stay young and strong.
You responded with tears of bitterness,
with an erasable marker producing alienation.
You sent dried roses in the envelope,
red hot stars to the cold moon
to signal you love has wings.
You changed the love lyrics of language.

I will not write you another love poem,
to bid farewell to an old romance that faded away.
You said “There is no happy love life with you in my world.”
I wrote to you at last so I could forget you.
I penned my last words with a heartache.
You dressed your heart with a dirty robe,
covered your soul with a black mask, 
to be unseen, untouched…
It remains invisible to love at first sight.

I will not write you another love song for a last time.
My last love song is written in an erasable ink.
This is my farewell letter to you,
a woman who turned away from her first sight love.
She exposed all its imperfections.
I will not write to you.
I have no need to remember and to reimagine,
because this love was never true.

I will not write you another love poem.
My new love song is for another poet,
an admirer of love languages,
a poet of love,
a champion of beauty.
You never set your heart to love me.
You never pursued me with a love that lasts.
My pain is turned into shouts of joy,
cheers of delight.
My peace is restored.
All is well with me.

I will not write you another love poem.
You burned my poetry book,
my love languages notebook is torn in scattered pieces.
You turned off the radio when the poet sings
“Love is strong and eternal.”
Your love is not my love.
You ended love, you pushed the sun away.
You betrayed a love, 
so innocent, true, and pure.
This is my last love poem to you.

“Haiti Then and Now”: The Most Widely Read Interviews of 2021

“Haiti Then and Now”: The Most Widely Read Interviews of 2021

Hello Fans and Readers: It is our pleasure to announce the most widely-read interviews of 2021, which we conducted for “Haiti Then and Now” (HTN) during the year 2021, as part of our series of conversations entitled “Haitian/Haitianist Thinkers in the Public Space: An Interview Series.”


We hope you will take the time to read, reread them, and even share them with the people in your circle. We also hope you will find them inspiring, empowering, and informative as we continue “to engage and reflect critically on the human condition–past, present, and future– in Haiti and the Haitian experience in the Haitian Diaspora.”

1. “Haiti Then and Now”: Conversation avec Dr.  Jhon Byron (Parts 1 & 2):
https://haitithenandnow.wordpress.com/2021/11/24/haiti-then-and-now-conversation-avec-dr-jhon-picard-byron-premiere-partie/

2. “Haiti Then and Now” Interviews Professor Lewis Ampidu Clorméus (published both in French and English):
https://haitithenandnow.wordpress.com/2021/08/07/haiti-then-and-now-interviews-professor-lewis-ampidu-clormeus/

3. “Haiti Then and Now” Interviews Professor Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall :
https://haitithenandnow.wordpress.com/2021/03/01/haiti-then-and-now-interviews-professor-alyssa-goldstein-sepinwall/

4. “Haiti Then and Now”: Conversation avec Dre Sabine Lamour  (published both in French and English):
https://haitithenandnow.wordpress.com/2021/01/06/haiti-then-and-now-conversation-avec-dre-sabine-lamour/

5. “Haiti Then and Now” Interviews Dr. Tammie Jenkins:

We look forward to interviewing more thinkers and scholars in the new year 2022 and keeping you informed about what’s going on in the world of Haitian Studies and academia.

Happy reading!
Bonne lecture!

“Winter Births”: A poem for the New Year

As we are looking forward to the new year 2022, I wrote a new poem, “Winter Births,” to imagine a new experience of bliss and optimism. Happy reading, Good People!

“Winter Births”

The harsh weather of fall did not delay your coming.
You come in the spring and allow babies to be born
and live under your care,
before the spring temperatures set in and the parrots sing for joy,
you make new nests for orphaned birds.
Our best defense is to let go our desires to your affection.
You bloom in early autumn,
flourish as time comes near
we hold on to future possibilities,
rising to new eternities
kindness to all children you will be
satisfied youth you will make
When you are here, you add texture and meaning to the new start.

Like the snowdrops of the new dawn, the carnation of winter births,
lead us to the doorway of this new future,
Haven in a foreign land in summer blues,
give us a new passage of peace in winter,
the two faces of time, let us live the fantasy of your kind
diamond in the flesh, we are caught up in your love affair
memory and desire, stirring up our delight
You keep us warm, covering our pain
We are your imagination of tomorrow

Like the daffodils of March, your coming is first sight love,
wiping away the tears of year past
happiness vision you bring
feelings of hope after a long-rough summer
You, the new year, make joy new, pleasure wine delight
treasure love leads our way toward you
It cannot be duplicated,
nor should it be replaced by another form,
a new moment of joy you introduce
a new experience, a chorus of rousing cheers.
ALL EYES FIXED ON YOU!
You, the sunny bloom hidden in the bosom of my mother.

“The Migration of a Star: A Noël Poem”

Merry Christmas🎄and Happy Holidays to you and your family!

“The Migration of a Star: A Noël Poem”

The Divine touched the earth by giving us a star
to behold and light our path.
Its origin is as ancient as the oldest galaxy,
greater than the big bang of life force.
Securing in its hands are many gifts for all God’s children:
Bethlehem joy in the time of sorrow
Mighty comfort in moments of trouble
Just liberation for tomorrow.
We followed its lead
and learned to walk by its side:
one step toward its love,
two steps to touch its heart,
three steps until we become one.

Our eyes were watching the star
not to overcome it, but to welcome its joy into our homes.
We became anxious by its proximity,
and willingness to find another home.
It moved gently and kissed the dust tracks of life,
transforming them to glory on high,
birthing new children of grace to the Father on high,
with the gentle touch of the Spirit of love.

We marvelled and lost track of time.
It holds eternity in its right hand,
our life through time that will never end.
The star filled the vast space in which it migrated:
abandoned corners of the earth renewed,
hidden spaces made visible,
erased sins with the pencil of God.
Our eyes were watching God, Three in One,
becoming a star to give us light and redemption.

“’The Haitian Turn,’ from 2012 to 2022: A New Critical Assessment of the Most Recent Literature on the Haitian Revolution”

“’The Haitian Turn,’ from 2012 to 2022: A New Critical Assessment of the Most Recent Literature on the Haitian Revolution”

The Haitian Revolution was a watershed moment in the triumph of human emancipation and human rights in global history. It was also a memorable event that has changed the slave culture and reversed colonial powers in the Atlantic world. In fact, the Haitian Revolution gave birth to a new people and new citizens, and a new land: the nation of Haiti. It continues to prompt contemporary ideas and actions about the colonial and postcolonial order, political sovereignty and interventions, as well as contemporary writings about the phenomenon of slavery, oppression, and human freedom.

In 2010 when I was writing the prospectus for my doctoral dissertation at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), I coined the phrase “The Haitian Turn” to describe the diasporic buzz Haiti’s national history and the Haitian Revolution had created in the (African) Atlantic world; in particular, I was interested on the influence of revolutionary Haiti in the birth of Black internationalism and Africana literary and intellectual traditions in the twentieth-century. I also coined another phrase “Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC)” (as a conceptual model) to explain the theoretical framework and the historical discourse of The Haitian Turn in the African Atlantic. In fact, my PhD dissertation is entitled “’The Haitian Turn:’ Haiti, the Black Atlantic, and Black Transnational Consciousness” (2012). My PhD is in Literary Studies with concentrations in African American Literature, African American Intellectual History, and Caribbean Culture and Literature. Interestingly, my brilliant and patient doctoral supervisor, Dr. Tim Redman, advised me to publish my analytical assessment on the literature of the Haitian Revolution and stated that I should use the captivating term “The Haitian Turn” in the title of my peer-reviewed article. I listened to my advisor and published the article with the suggested title:
“’The Haitian Turn’: An Appraisal of Recent Literary and Historiographical Works on the Haitian Revolution,” The Journal of Pan African Studies, 5:6 (September 2012):37-55. This essay would become my most cited article in the academic world.

Five years later, in 2017, I decided to go back to the idea of “Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC)” and wrote a follow-up article that needed to be read in conjunction with the one I previously published on “The Haitian Turn.” Hence, I submitted the article to Vanguard, a bilingual academic journal, to be published. I was fortunate the editor has accepted it with minor revisions. The article was published simultaneously in both English and Spanish languages, bearing the fowling titles:

“Beyond Ethnic Blackness: Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC) and the Practice of Black Intertextuality” (English Version), Vanguard / vol. 1(1) / 2017 /43-68.

“Más Allá de la Negrura Étnica: La Conciencia Transnacional Negra y la Práctica de la Intertextualidad Negra (Spanish Version), Vanguardia/ vol. 1(1) / 2017 /44-70.

Perhaps, I should have mentioned the following statement at the beginning of the post to serve as a preface. By training, I am a literary historian and theologian. Some of my research interests include Theological anthropology and ethics, Liberation and Political theologies, Haitian literature and the Haitian Revolution, and the religious sensibilities of the Haitian people and people of African descent. As an intellectual historian, I examine, for example, Black epistemologies and the intellectual traditions of both Francophone and Anglophone worlds of the African Atlantic. Because of my interdisciplinary interest, I always try to stay current on the emerging literature of the Haitian Revolution in North America and among the English-speaking people. Since the publication of my article, “’The Haitian Turn’: An Appraisal of Recent Literary and Historiographical Works on the Haitian Revolution,” in 2012, there have been more than two dozen well-researched and excellent books published in the English language on the Haitian Revolution and its impact in world history.

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of The Haitian Turn (the referenced article above) and to keep students of the Haitian Revolution current on the most recent published texts (books, not articles) in the English language on the Haitian Revolution, in 2022, I will publish the sequel to The Haitian Turn. The Year 2022 will also be the tenth-year anniversary since I earned my first PhD. The new article will be an analytical evaluation and critical review of some two dozen major books on the Haitian Revolution. In this post, I would like to share with you the titles of these texts to be analyzed in the article. Translation works from French to English are marked by an asterisk. A few texts below are not specialized studies on the Haitian Revolution, but they are significant enough to be examined as they engage directly the politics, ideas, events, and actors of the Haitian Revolution.

  1. *The Infamous Rosalie by Évelyne Trouillot, translated by Marjorie Attignol Salvodon (University of Nebraska Press, 2013)
  2. Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2014) by Ada Ferrer
  3. The Haitian Revolution: A Documentary History (Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., 2014) by David Geggus
  4. Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865 (Liverpool University Press, 2015) by Marlene L. Daut
  5. Confronting Black Jacobins: The U.S., the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic (Monthly Review Press, 2015) by Gerald Horne
  6. Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World: Recognition after Revolution (The University of North Carolina Press, 2015) by Julia Gaffield
  7. *Toussaint Louverture: A Revolutionary Life (Basic Books, 2016) by Philippe Girard
  8. The Haitian Declaration of Independence: Creation, Context, and Legacy (University of Virginia Press, 2016) edited by Julia Gaffield
  9. An Islandwide Struggle for Freedom: Revolution, Emancipation, and Reenslavement in Hispaniola, 1789-1809 (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) by Graham T. Nessler
  10. The Memoir of General Toussaint Louverture (Oxford University Press, 2017) by Toussaint Louverture, translated and edited by Philippe R. Girard
  11. The Black Jacobins Reader (Duke University Press, 2017) edited by Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg
  12. Baron de Vastey and the Origins of Black Atlantic Humanism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017 by Marlene L. Daut
  13. Toussaint Louverture: A Black Jacobin in the Age of Revolutions (Pluto Press, 2017) by Charles Forsdick and Christian Hogsbjerg
  14. *Dance on the Volcano (Archipelago, 2017) by Marie Vieux-Chauvet, translated by Kaiama L Glover
  15. Philanthropy and Race in the Haitian Revolution (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) by Erica R. Johnson
  16. The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution (Verso Books, 2018) by Julius S. Scott
  17. Maroon Nation: A History of Revolutionary Haiti (Yale University Press, 2019) by Johnhenry Gonzalez
  18. Making The Black Jacobins: C. L. R. James and the Drama of History (Duke University Press, 2019) by Rachel Douglas
  19. Rethinking the Haitian Revolution: Slavery, Independence, and the Struggle for Recognition (‎Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2019) by Alex Dupuy
  20. Black Spartacus: The Epic Life of Toussaint Louverture (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2020) by Sudhir Harvesting
  21. Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games (University Press of Mississippi, 2021) by Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
  22. Rituals, Runaways, and the Haitian Revolution: Collective Action in the African Diaspora (Cambridge University Press, 2021) by Crystal Nicole Eddins
  23. Stirring the Pot of Haitian History (Liverpool University Press, 2021) by Michel-Rolph Trouillot, translated by Mariana F. Past and Benjamin Hebblethwaite
  24. Haitian Revolutionary Fictions: An Anthology (will be published by the University of Virginia Press on January 25, 2022) edited by Marlene L. Daut, Grégory Pierrot, and Marion C. Rohrleitner

• In the new article, I am interested to investigate what new ideas and archival materials about the Haitian Revolution have these new texts/authors introduced to the discipline of history and the field of Haitian Studies.
• I am also concerned about the hermeneutics of the Haitian Revolution and its corresponding social and political events in the Atlantic world (1789-1803). For example, have these books shed new light about the rapport of the Haitian Revolution and the French and American Revolutions, as well as the political governments of Saint-Domingue, England, the United States, Spain, and France?
• In addition to their autonomous thoughts and colonial intellectual climate in the American continent, what contemporary intellectual currents have shaped the abolitionist ideas and political interventions of the actors—both men and women—of the Haitian Revolution?
• What place does gender play when we study the French colony of Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution from the perspective of women? Does any of these texts engage the political ideas and actions of Women of the Haitian Revolution?
• What have these new texts inform us more about the religious, socio-economic, cultural, racial, and political order of Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution?

*Please leave me a comment below if you have any recommended important texts, written in English in the past ten years (2012-2022), you would like me to assess in the article).

Happy reading!

“’The Haitian Turn,’ from 2012 to 2022: A New Critical Assessment of the Most Recent Literature on the Haitian Revolution”

“’The Haitian Turn,’ from 2012 to 2022: A New Critical Assessment of the Most Recent Literature on the Haitian Revolution”

The Haitian Revolution was a watershed moment in the triumph of human emancipation and human rights in global history. It was also a memorable event that has changed the slave culture and reversed colonial powers in the Atlantic world. In fact, the Haitian Revolution gave birth to a new people and new citizens, and a new land: the nation of Haiti. It continues to prompt contemporary ideas and actions about the colonial and postcolonial order, political sovereignty and interventions, as well as contemporary writings about the phenomenon of slavery, oppression, and human freedom.

In 2010 when I was writing the prospectus for my doctoral dissertation at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), I coined the phrase “The Haitian Turn” to describe the diasporic buzz Haiti’s national history and the Haitian Revolution had created in the (African) Atlantic world; in particular, I was interested on the influence of revolutionary Haiti in the birth of Black internationalism and Africana literary and intellectual traditions in the twentieth-century. I also coined another phrase “Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC)” (as a conceptual model) to explain the theoretical framework and the historical discourse of The Haitian Turn in the African Atlantic. In fact, my PhD dissertation is entitled “’The Haitian Turn:’ Haiti, the Black Atlantic, and Black Transnational Consciousness” (2012). My PhD is in Literary Studies with concentrations in African American Literature, African American Intellectual History, and Caribbean Culture and Literature. Interestingly, my brilliant and patient doctoral supervisor, Dr. Tim Redman, advised me to publish my analytical assessment on the literature of the Haitian Revolution and stated that I should use the captivating term “The Haitian Turn” in the title of my peer-reviewed article. I listened to my advisor and published the article with the suggested title:
“’The Haitian Turn’: An Appraisal of Recent Literary and Historiographical Works on the Haitian Revolution,” The Journal of Pan African Studies, 5:6 (September 2012):37-55. This essay would become my most cited article in the academic world.

Five years later, in 2017, I decided to go back to the idea of “Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC)” and wrote a follow-up article that needed to be read in conjunction with the one I previously published on “The Haitian Turn.” Hence, I submitted the article to Vanguard, a bilingual academic journal, to be published. I was fortunate the editor has accepted it with minor revisions. The article was published simultaneously in both English and Spanish languages, bearing the fowling titles:

“Beyond Ethnic Blackness: Black Transnational Consciousness (BTC) and the Practice of Black Intertextuality” (English Version), Vanguard / vol. 1(1) / 2017 /43-68.

“Más Allá de la Negrura Étnica: La Conciencia Transnacional Negra y la Práctica de la Intertextualidad Negra (Spanish Version), Vanguardia/ vol. 1(1) / 2017 /44-70.

Perhaps, I should have mentioned the following statement at the beginning of the post to serve as a preface. By training, I am a literary historian and theologian. Some of my research interests include Theological anthropology and ethics, Liberation and Political theologies, Haitian literature and the Haitian Revolution, and the religious sensibilities of the Haitian people and people of African descent. As an intellectual historian, I examine, for example, Black epistemologies and the intellectual traditions of both Francophone and Anglophone worlds of the African Atlantic. Because of my interdisciplinary interest, I always try to stay current on the emerging literature of the Haitian Revolution in North America and among the English-speaking people. Since the publication of my article, “’The Haitian Turn’: An Appraisal of Recent Literary and Historiographical Works on the Haitian Revolution,” in 2012, there have been more than two dozen well-researched and excellent books published in the English language on the Haitian Revolution and its impact in world history.

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of The Haitian Turn (the referenced article above) and to keep students of the Haitian Revolution current on the most recent published texts (books, not articles) in the English language on the Haitian Revolution, in 2022, I will publish the sequel to The Haitian Turn. The Year 2022 will also be the tenth-year anniversary since I earned my first PhD. The new article will be an analytical evaluation and critical review of some two dozen major books on the Haitian Revolution. In this post, I would like to share with you the titles of these texts to be analyzed in the article. Translation works from French to English are marked by an asterisk. A few texts below are not specialized studies on the Haitian Revolution, but they are significant enough to be examined as they engage directly the politics, ideas, events, and actors of the Haitian Revolution.

  1. *The Infamous Rosalie by Évelyne Trouillot, translated by Marjorie Attignol Salvodon (University of Nebraska Press, 2013)
  2. Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2014) by Ada Ferrer
  3. The Haitian Revolution: A Documentary History (Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., 2014) by David Geggus
  4. Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865 (Liverpool University Press, 2015) by Marlene L. Daut
  5. Confronting Black Jacobins: The U.S., the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic (Monthly Review Press, 2015) by Gerald Horne
  6. Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World: Recognition after Revolution (The University of North Carolina Press, 2015) by Julia Gaffield
  7. *Toussaint Louverture: A Revolutionary Life (Basic Books, 2016) by Philippe Girard
  8. The Haitian Declaration of Independence: Creation, Context, and Legacy (University of Virginia Press, 2016) edited by Julia Gaffield
  9. An Islandwide Struggle for Freedom: Revolution, Emancipation, and Reenslavement in Hispaniola, 1789-1809 (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) by Graham T. Nessler
  10. The Memoir of General Toussaint Louverture (Oxford University Press, 2017) by Toussaint Louverture, translated and edited by Philippe R. Girard
  11. The Black Jacobins Reader (Duke University Press, 2017) edited by Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg
  12. Baron de Vastey and the Origins of Black Atlantic Humanism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017 by Marlene L. Daut
  13. Toussaint Louverture: A Black Jacobin in the Age of Revolutions (Pluto Press, 2017) by Charles Forsdick and Christian Hogsbjerg
  14. *Dance on the Volcano (Archipelago, 2017) by Marie Vieux-Chauvet, translated by Kaiama L Glover
  15. Philanthropy and Race in the Haitian Revolution (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) by Erica R. Johnson
  16. The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution (Verso Books, 2018) by Julius S. Scott
  17. Maroon Nation: A History of Revolutionary Haiti (Yale University Press, 2019) by Johnhenry Gonzalez
  18. Making The Black Jacobins: C. L. R. James and the Drama of History (Duke University Press, 2019) by Rachel Douglas
  19. Rethinking the Haitian Revolution: Slavery, Independence, and the Struggle for Recognition (‎Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2019) by Alex Dupuy
  20. Black Spartacus: The Epic Life of Toussaint Louverture (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2020) by Sudhir Harvesting
  21. Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games (University Press of Mississippi, 2021) by Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
  22. Rituals, Runaways, and the Haitian Revolution: Collective Action in the African Diaspora (Cambridge University Press, 2021) by Crystal Nicole Eddins
  23. Stirring the Pot of Haitian History (Liverpool University Press, 2021) by Michel-Rolph Trouillot, translated by Mariana F. Past and Benjamin Hebblethwaite
  24. Haitian Revolutionary Fictions: An Anthology (will be published by the University of Virginia Press on January 25, 2022) edited by Marlene L. Daut, Grégory Pierrot, and Marion C. Rohrleitner

• In the new article, I am interested to investigate what new ideas and archival materials about the Haitian Revolution have these new texts/authors introduced to the discipline of history and the field of Haitian Studies.
• I am also concerned about the hermeneutics of the Haitian Revolution and its corresponding social and political events in the Atlantic world (1789-1803). For example, have these books shed new light about the rapport of the Haitian Revolution and the French and American Revolutions, as well as the political governments of Saint-Domingue, England, the United States, Spain, and France?
• In addition to their autonomous thoughts and colonial intellectual climate in the American continent, what contemporary intellectual currents have shaped the abolitionist ideas and political interventions of the actors—both men and women—of the Haitian Revolution?
• What place does gender play when we study the French colony of Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution from the perspective of women? Does any of these texts engage the political ideas and actions of Women of the Haitian Revolution?
• What have these new texts inform us more about the religious, socio-economic, cultural, racial, and political order of Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution?

*Please leave me a comment below if you have any recommended important texts, written in English in the past ten years (2012-2022), you would like me to assess in the article).

Happy reading!

“Love and Commitment Among Young People: Year 2022 and Beyond”

“Love and Commitment Among Young People: Year 2022 and Beyond”

Commitment to relationship in the twenty-first century is progressively becoming something of the past; it is indeed a rare occurrence between young people in the American culture and of this generation, especially among young American males.

Nonetheless, it gives me great joy and delight to see many young men in this generation are making more marriage proposals to their future spouses, and they’re cerebrating them openly on social media and with their friends. This attitude toward love gives me abundant hope as many young men in this generation are often afraid to love and worried about deliberate permanent commitment to relationships and intentional long-term marriages.

Let’s hope in the new year (2022), young people will give love another chance, will love more passionately and more actively, and will commit to each love more faithfully in loving relationships and marital bond.

Here are my five words of advice to you:

  1. Do not rush to love when the moment is not favorable.
  2. Do not postpone love when it is the right time and most beautiful thing to do at the moment.
  3. Genuine love and sustaining commitment work together, and they should never be separated in relationships or marriages.
  4. Love and desire are not the same, but desire fuels love toward beauty, kindness, passion, and reciprocity.
  5. Love should always link to passion to make it more envious, enticing, and delightful.
  6. Love is an imitation. Learn from those, including your parents, friends, and family members, who have cultivated years of strong bond of love and nurtured a life-commitment to endless love and fidelity.
  7. Always remember that love still remains the highest form of human virtue and the most desirable emotion among people, as well as the highest expression of self-giving, life-commitment, and human openness/hospitality.

“The Migration of a Star: A Noël Poem”

Happy Sunday, Good People!

As many of us begin to think about “The Advent,” an important moment in Christianity’s sacred calendar, I wrote a poem this morning about the mystery of the incarnation, in which God in the person of Jesus became a human being to redeem all children of God. I named this new poem “The Migration of a Star.” Happy reading!

“The Migration of a Star: A Noël Poem”

The Divine touched the earth by giving us a star
to behold and light our path.
Its origin is as ancient as the oldest galaxy,
greater than the big bang of life force.
Securing in its hands are many gifts for all God’s children:
Bethlehem joy in the time of sorrow
Mighty comfort in moments of trouble
Just liberation for tomorrow.
We followed its lead
and learned to walk by its side:
one step toward its love,
two steps to touch its heart,
three steps until we become one.

Our eyes were watching the star
not to overcome it, but to welcome its joy into our homes.
We became anxious by its proximity,
and willingness to find another home.
It moved gently and kissed the dust tracks of life,
transforming them to glory on high,
birthing new children of grace to the Father on high,
with the gentle touch of the Spirit of love.

We marvelled and lost track of time.
It holds eternity in its right hand,
our life through time that will never end.
The star filled the vast space in which it migrated:
abandoned corners of the earth renewed,
hidden spaces made visible,
erased sins with the pencil of God.
Our eyes were watching God, Three in One,
becoming a star to give us light and redemption.